Asian (Oriental) Medicine Modalities

 

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a form of health care that promotes the body's natural healing process. The practice of inserting very fine sterile, disposable needles into specific points on the body – known as acupoints – has a successful track record dating back more than 2,500 years. It is based on the theory that vital energy called qi runs through the body along specific channels called meridians. Sometimes this energy gets blocked or flows abnormally resulting in illness. The insertion of fine needles into specific points unblocks the energy and restores the body's healthy balance. 

Bodywork

Tui Na or Chinese Massage, involves medical manipulation of the soft tissue, using techniques such as lateral decompression, grasping, pulling, traction, pressing, and rolling. Tui Na helps break-up blockages and promotes circulation and increased range of motion. Removing these blockages restores the balance of qi in the body, leading to improved health and vitality. These techniques can be applied to all parts of the body to address both internal and musculoskeletal disorders.  It may be utilized before or after an acupuncture treatment to support and enhance the benefits of acupuncture.

Exercise

Qi Gong and Tai Chi are ancient Chinese techniques that integrate physical postures, breathing techniques and focused intention. They incorporate physical movements that circulate energy in a way to promote healing. Usually these movements are designed to generate better integration of the whole body and to support everyday movements. It has many functions including helping the body's qi move more smoothly, reducing stiffness and soreness, and increasing the body's relaxation. Specific exercises may be recommended to support the acupuncture treatment.

Nutrition

“Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food”

-Hippocrates

In Chinese dietary therapy, food is considered as medicine and a patient’s diet is modified based on individual needs. All foods have specific properties and nutritional value to them above and beyond their vitamin and mineral content. Foods are recommended based on their properties, such as temperature and nature, as well as the patient’s constitution and the season of the year. It helps support the benefits of acupuncture and aids in preventing disease. Each person’s health is significantly influenced by the foods he or she consumes.

Colleen O'Neill, MAc

Licensed Acupuncturist

Depew Health Center

4974 Transit Rd

Depew NY 14043

Telephone : ​(716) 685-9631

Email : oneillacupuncture@gmail.com

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(c) 2015 ONeill Acupuncture, Colleen O'Neill MAc, LAc.

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